Nervous Hic

I'm Wrexie. I draw sometimes, but mostly I reblog what interests me. I have a phonic tic that sounds like a hiccup. Click to see just my art! Tumbleystuck (start)
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Posts tagged sordfighting

Aug 9 '14

art-of-swords:

Engraved and Gilt Partisan

  • Dating: late 17th century
  • Culture: European
  • Measurements: height 190.5 cm

The weapon has an iron head with a large, straight-edged cusp-blade, ribbed at the centre, with wings, tapering socket provided with rings at both edges, while the upper one is smooth with three rings.

The surface of the lower half of the blade blade, from its half to the socket, is decorated with engravings and remains of gilding; featuring symmetric effigies of flowers, grotesque masks and spirals, on dotted ground.

The wings are shaped and engraved as exotic birds and snakes, the socket decorated with floral bands. Antique, wooden haft of circular section, comes with longitudinal, fluted decorations alternated to rows of brass studs.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

3,142 notes (via art-of-swords)Tags: but this makes me happy sordfighting

Dec 4 '13
dothraklingon:

infuriatingly-adorable:

whiskey-wolf:

And this is what happens when a masterfully crafted katana collides with a masterfully crafted longsword.
Suck it, katana

And that is what happens when a masterfully crafted scalpel collides with a masterfully crafted guillotine.
Does nobody understand that longswords and katanas are two different kinds of tool?Longswords are essentially sharpened fucksticks designed to destroy the shit out of anything resembling armor that comes their way. They shatter bone, jelly flesh, and essentially fuck people up by sheer inexorable force of being a goddamn sharp steel bar.
Katanas don’t do that.They’re not meant to withstand collision with armor or a brick wall or a charging fully outfitted warhorsebecause the circumstances of its development didn’t call for that. It’s a precision instrument. It’s designed to be lightweight, outmaneuver, and find weak spots, not go barreling into people hack-n-slashing your way to victory. It’s a specialized tool.
In a sense this reflects a core difference between cultures; katanas are a shitton of work and preparation to make the execution as efficient and streamlined as possible, while longswords are more durably and simply made in response to a climate that would require a soldier to be a one-man battering ram in battle.

You slam any blade into any other blade and one of them is at least going to get chipped, because you’re NOT SUPPOSED TO FUCKING DO THAT.
Medieval European / Japanese sword-fighting manuals didn’t have “Now Clang the Swords Together and Totally Ruin Them For No Good Reason Whatsoever” sections. That sword-clanging crap is from movies because you want to show a 2 minute dancey sword-fight and have to do something during that time, because in real sword fights it’s either over in 25 seconds with one guy on the ground, dead, or it goes on for 4 hours as two guys in armor wear themselves out, slamming the broad sides of the sword against the armor.
Swords aren’t lightsabers.
This is like proving a Volkswagen Beetle is a “crap car” by running it into a bridge pylon at 85 mph. It’s a pointless demonstration, because you’re not supposed to do that.
Neither one of these weapons was invented to cut another sword in half, Both were invented to cut a GUY in half. In slightly different ways, but still.

dothraklingon:

infuriatingly-adorable:

whiskey-wolf:

And this is what happens when a masterfully crafted katana collides with a masterfully crafted longsword.

Suck it, katana

And that is what happens when a masterfully crafted scalpel collides with a masterfully crafted guillotine.

Does nobody understand that longswords and katanas are two different kinds of tool?Longswords are essentially sharpened fucksticks designed to destroy the shit out of anything resembling armor that comes their way. They shatter bone, jelly flesh, and essentially fuck people up by sheer inexorable force of being a goddamn sharp steel bar.

Katanas don’t do that.They’re not meant to withstand collision with armor or a brick wall or a charging fully outfitted warhorsebecause the circumstances of its development didn’t call for that. It’s a precision instrument. It’s designed to be lightweight, outmaneuver, and find weak spots, not go barreling into people hack-n-slashing your way to victory. It’s a specialized tool.

In a sense this reflects a core difference between cultures; katanas are a shitton of work and preparation to make the execution as efficient and streamlined as possible, while longswords are more durably and simply made in response to a climate that would require a soldier to be a one-man battering ram in battle.

You slam any blade into any other blade and one of them is at least going to get chipped, because you’re NOT SUPPOSED TO FUCKING DO THAT.

Medieval European / Japanese sword-fighting manuals didn’t have “Now Clang the Swords Together and Totally Ruin Them For No Good Reason Whatsoever” sections. That sword-clanging crap is from movies because you want to show a 2 minute dancey sword-fight and have to do something during that time, because in real sword fights it’s either over in 25 seconds with one guy on the ground, dead, or it goes on for 4 hours as two guys in armor wear themselves out, slamming the broad sides of the sword against the armor.

Swords aren’t lightsabers.

This is like proving a Volkswagen Beetle is a “crap car” by running it into a bridge pylon at 85 mph. It’s a pointless demonstration, because you’re not supposed to do that.

Neither one of these weapons was invented to cut another sword in half, Both were invented to cut a GUY in half. In slightly different ways, but still.

102,472 notes (via dissimo & whiskey-wolf)Tags: : \ yeah stop saying either one is better it's like comparing apples and oranges sure you might personally like one more than the other but there's nothing inherently better about either of them okay sordfighting

Jun 15 '13
chelsamander:

Dagger leggings!

chelsamander:

Dagger leggings!

7,561 notes (via hauntedcandle & chelsamander)Tags: sordfighting *n* fashion

Jun 14 '13

(Source: calvinandhobbit)

86,044 notes (via mirrepp & calvinandhobbit)Tags: frick sordfighting

May 12 '13

art-of-swords:

Sword-Catching Parrying Dagger

  • Dated: 1600
  • Culture: Italian

This unusual fencing dagger demonstrates the way in which the artistic qualities of a weapon could be influenced by the practical concerns of the swordsman. The Renaissance duel was usually fought with rapier and dagger. The rapier, as the main weapon of attack, was complemented by a parrying dagger held in the left hand, used primarily for defensive movements.

However, by 1600 fighting with the rapier alone was becoming the latest fashion. The opposing blade could still be parried or beaten away with the left hand. The free left also allowed the duellist to grab hold of his enemy’s swordblade, temporarily immobilising it to expose him to a lethal counter-thrust.  

This distinctive fencing weapon is designed to provide the blade-grabbing ability of the free left hand, while retaining the dagger for defensive action. The arrow-like barbs allowed a sword blade to enter the ‘jaw’ of the dagger, but made it difficult to free it again. With his weapon ensnared, the enemy was exposed, if only for an instant.

The practical challenges of creating such a specialised weapon were considerable. The hardened and tempered steel blade had to be carefully cut with the series of dramatically barbed teeth, a laborious process. The spaces between the teeth have been elegantly filed with ornamental edges, while the base of the blade has been finely etched and gilt- an unusual feature, even for high-quality weapons. In this way, despite its very specific function as a fighting tool, the weapon’s artistic merit is evident.

Source & Copyright: The Wallace Collection

4,761 notes (via tyvianred & art-of-swords)Tags: wowza sordfighting

May 2 '13

art-of-swords:

Sword 

  • Dated: about 1480
  • Culture: probably German

The sword comes with a writhen hilt.

Source & Copyright: Royal Armouries

452 notes (via art-of-swords)Tags: hello there beautiful *u* sordfighting

Apr 29 '13
hclark70:

cruco:

nerdmorgan:

carrotatheart:

A Blizzard employee exclusive sword and shield set is on eBay for $9,999.99. 
The shield features the crest of Lordaeron ;_; 

Oh god if I had the money

okay yeah im salivating over here and all but
WHY WOULD ANYONE EVER EVER
EVER
SELL THIS?!
WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH YOU?!!!!!

the employee must need money for game time.

hclark70:

cruco:

nerdmorgan:

carrotatheart:

A Blizzard employee exclusive sword and shield set is on eBay for $9,999.99.

The shield features the crest of Lordaeron ;_; 

Oh god if I had the money

okay yeah im salivating over here and all but

WHY WOULD ANYONE EVER EVER

EVER

SELL THIS?!

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH YOU?!!!!!

the employee must need money for game time.

174 notes (via hclark70 & carrotatheart)Tags: wHINES.. It's beautiful maybe the employee has no particular attatchment to it and would rather a fan have it instead? ;; world of warcraft posting sordfighting

Apr 28 '13
petermorwood:



art-of-swords:



Sword Facts & Myths
All Medieval swords weighed at least 12 pounds – FALSE
Most Medieval swords weighed around 2.5 lbs - even long hand-and-a-half and two-handed swords weighed less than 4 lbs.
Medieval swords were not sharp - FALSE
Some surviving samples of Medieval swords are still sharp - many are razor-sharp.
All swords should balance within 2” of the guard - FALSE
A sword’s balance should be determined by its function, not an arbitrary standard. Swords intended for cutting often balance 5 or 6 inches from the guard.
Swords were made to cut through armour - FALSE
Period armour was often work- and case-hardened and curved such that it is difficult to hit at a right angle. Late Medieval thrusting swords, even the ones with a reinforced point, were used to thrust into the gaps in armour, not through the plate.
Viking swords were heavier than Medieval swords - FALSE
The Viking sword was a very highly developed sword form. Often the blades were quite thin in cross section, and as a result, were often the same or lighter in overall weight than other similarsized swords.
There is no such thing as the “perfect” sword - TRUE
There are only “perfect” swords for their intended purpose and the tastes of the owner.
A “good” sword should be able to bend past 90 degrees without taking a set - FALSE
Flexibility is only one of the aspects of the steel properties that is important in a sword. Too flexible, and it is inefficient in the thrust and the cut. Too stiff and it is prone to breakage. Most makers are content if a sword will bend to 45 degrees without taking a set.
Real swordfights were just like they are in the movies - FALSE
Swordfights in movies are choreographed for entertainment not authenticity. Edge to edge parries and fancy techniques are designed to heighten drama in a scene. An actual swordfight would be short, brutal and much quieter.
Japanese swords are the sharpest and best swords ever made - FALSE
Japanese swords have many admirable qualities and were well-suited to their intended use, but they are not necessarily sharper or better than a properly designed and sharpened Medieval sword. 
Medieval swordmakers were uneducated barbarians - FALSE
It is apparent from even a cursory study of surviving Medieval swords that blademakers and cutlers were highly skilled artisans with a profound understanding of mathematics and proportion.
Not all swords should be as sharp as a razor - TRUE
The sword’s intended purpose is always the guide to use — thrusting swords are not intended for cutting, so some may not even have an edge at all, just a well-defined and reinforced point.
Swords were tempered in urine or blood - FALSE
The steels smelted in Medieval Europe required either clean water or oil for quenching. Urine or blood would not allow a blade to temper properly.
The “blood groove” is on a sword to release pressure in the wound and allow the sword to come back out - FALSE
“Blood groove” as a term is a recent invention — “fuller” is the proper name for the groove or grooves on a sword blade. The purpose of the fuller has nothing to do with “blood” — fullers reduce weight, assist in the proper distribution of mass in a blade, and help make the blade more stiff.
A good sword can cut through a concrete pillar - FALSE
Swords were intended to cut through flesh, clothing, and (in earlier swords) leather or mail armour. They are not intended to cut wood, concrete or metal pillars, even though that is often seen in films.
A sword will fall apart if you don’t clean the tang of the sword - FALSE
The tang of a sword, if properly made and the rest of the sword properly maintained, will not require any maintenance for generations of use. 
Japanese folded steel is superior to European sword steel - FALSE
Folding steel was a technique used by Japanese smiths to try to get the best steel they could from very poor ore sources. Folded steel blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade. By folding the steel billet many, many times, they achieved a more even distribution of carbon and worked most of the impurities out of the steel. The result is stunningly beautiful, but we have to believe that if a 16th C Japanese smith had access to modern monosteels, he would have switched in a heartbeat.
Pattern-welded steel is superior to mono-steel - FALSE
Like folding steel, pattern-welding was a technique used to try to get the best steel from very poor ore sources.  Pattern-welding is the art of hammering together, and then twisting and re-hammering layers of iron (often of varying carbon content). The Celts as far back as the 5th century BC may have made swords by pattern-welding, and this technique was used extensively until at least the end of the 10th century.  After this, better, more consistent iron ore was obtainable, and furnace technology improved, making this laborious technique unnecessary. Also like folded steel blades, pattern welded blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade.
Swords are just big knives - FALSE
The design of a sword is far more complex than a knife. Flexibility  balance and vibration are far more critical in a sword-length blade than in a knife-length blade.



Info source: © 2005 Albion Armorers, Inc.
Photo source: © Royal Armouries






This information should be SO much better known.

petermorwood:

art-of-swords:

Sword Facts & Myths

  • All Medieval swords weighed at least 12 pounds – FALSE

Most Medieval swords weighed around 2.5 lbs - even long hand-and-a-half and two-handed swords weighed less than 4 lbs.

  • Medieval swords were not sharp - FALSE

Some surviving samples of Medieval swords are still sharp - many are razor-sharp.

  • All swords should balance within 2” of the guard - FALSE

A sword’s balance should be determined by its function, not an arbitrary standard. Swords intended for cutting often balance 5 or 6 inches from the guard.

  • Swords were made to cut through armour - FALSE

Period armour was often work- and case-hardened and curved such that it is difficult to hit at a right angle. Late Medieval thrusting swords, even the ones with a reinforced point, were used to thrust into the gaps in armour, not through the plate.

  • Viking swords were heavier than Medieval swords - FALSE

The Viking sword was a very highly developed sword form. Often the blades were quite thin in cross section, and as a result, were often the same or lighter in overall weight than other similarsized swords.

  • There is no such thing as the “perfect” sword - TRUE

There are only “perfect” swords for their intended purpose and the tastes of the owner.

  • A “good” sword should be able to bend past 90 degrees without taking a set - FALSE

Flexibility is only one of the aspects of the steel properties that is important in a sword. Too flexible, and it is inefficient in the thrust and the cut. Too stiff and it is prone to breakage. Most makers are content if a sword will bend to 45 degrees without taking a set.

  • Real swordfights were just like they are in the movies - FALSE

Swordfights in movies are choreographed for entertainment not authenticity. Edge to edge parries and fancy techniques are designed to heighten drama in a scene. An actual swordfight would be short, brutal and much quieter.

  • Japanese swords are the sharpest and best swords ever made - FALSE

Japanese swords have many admirable qualities and were well-suited to their intended use, but they are not necessarily sharper or better than a properly designed and sharpened Medieval sword. 

  • Medieval swordmakers were uneducated barbarians - FALSE

It is apparent from even a cursory study of surviving Medieval swords that blademakers and cutlers were highly skilled artisans with a profound understanding of mathematics and proportion.

  • Not all swords should be as sharp as a razor - TRUE

The sword’s intended purpose is always the guide to use — thrusting swords are not intended for cutting, so some may not even have an edge at all, just a well-defined and reinforced point.

  • Swords were tempered in urine or blood - FALSE

The steels smelted in Medieval Europe required either clean water or oil for quenching. Urine or blood would not allow a blade to temper properly.

  • The “blood groove” is on a sword to release pressure in the wound and allow the sword to come back out - FALSE

“Blood groove” as a term is a recent invention — “fuller” is the proper name for the groove or grooves on a sword blade. The purpose of the fuller has nothing to do with “blood” — fullers reduce weight, assist in the proper distribution of mass in a blade, and help make the blade more stiff.

  • A good sword can cut through a concrete pillar - FALSE

Swords were intended to cut through flesh, clothing, and (in earlier swords) leather or mail armour. They are not intended to cut wood, concrete or metal pillars, even though that is often seen in films.

  • A sword will fall apart if you don’t clean the tang of the sword - FALSE

The tang of a sword, if properly made and the rest of the sword properly maintained, will not require any maintenance for generations of use. 

  • Japanese folded steel is superior to European sword steel - FALSE

Folding steel was a technique used by Japanese smiths to try to get the best steel they could from very poor ore sources. Folded steel blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade. By folding the steel billet many, many times, they achieved a more even distribution of carbon and worked most of the impurities out of the steel. The result is stunningly beautiful, but we have to believe that if a 16th C Japanese smith had access to modern monosteels, he would have switched in a heartbeat.

  • Pattern-welded steel is superior to mono-steel - FALSE

Like folding steel, pattern-welding was a technique used to try to get the best steel from very poor ore sources.  Pattern-welding is the art of hammering together, and then twisting and re-hammering layers of iron (often of varying carbon content). The Celts as far back as the 5th century BC may have made swords by pattern-welding, and this technique was used extensively until at least the end of the 10th century.  After this, better, more consistent iron ore was obtainable, and furnace technology improved, making this laborious technique unnecessary. Also like folded steel blades, pattern welded blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade.

  • Swords are just big knives - FALSE

The design of a sword is far more complex than a knife. Flexibility  balance and vibration are far more critical in a sword-length blade than in a knife-length blade.

This information should be SO much better known.

17,252 notes (via tyvianred & art-of-swords)Tags: YES THANK YOU sordfighting

Apr 24 '13

6,785 notes (via frozenfangs & pxlbyte)Tags: omg it has frostmourne on there sordfighting yes I'm putting it in my sword tag shut up

Apr 21 '13

art-of-swords:

Longsword Geometry

Swordsmith Peter Johnsson shows a defining feature of the medieval sword is its beautiful and subtle proportions. In this video he presents how to design a longsword with geometry following principles of lay out similar to those used in architectural plans of Gothic cathedrals.

Source & Copyright: Peter Johnsson on YouTube

614 notes (via art-of-swords)Tags: video sordfighting